The rise and falls of Humpty Dumpty

https://www.amazon.com/Teachings-Toltec-Survivor-Koyote-Blind-ebook/dp/B07RMK9D4C/

A few millennia ago a community of groups formed in Mesoamerica, close to what is now Mexico City. As you know, many spiritual groups are small; some are very big. Think of moments in history when a lot of these small groups cannot operate because they are under totalitarian regimes, or because religious extremism prevails. Many of these groups sought to find a place where they could practice their spiritual craft and where they could do their group work without being threatened. There were so many empires everywhere in those days. Europe witnessed the rise of Egypt, Greece, Mesopotamia, and Rome. Asia saw the chinese dynasties and the Mongolian conquest. In America, the Incas, the Aztecs, and so many others wanted to do that as well, as if everyone remembered a period of one world government broken into pieces—like Humpty Dumpty—when knowledge was lost.

There are priestesses and priests who have pieces of that lost knowledge. While this big mass of humanity is trying to build empires, conquer, create trade, create technology, there are smaller groups who also remember what it was like and do not want it to be that way again. They do not want magic to be dominated by the aristocrats. A bunch of those little groups once upon a time made a trip to Teotihuacán, a place in the middle of a vast desert. No one was interested in that area, so they thought they would be left alone for a long time. This move was similar to what the Tibetans did by settling in the mountains.

After the Toltecs had been gone from Teotihuacán for two centuries, the Aztecs migrated from the North and discovered it. Mostly from Apache descent, these warriors came down Mexico following a vision. They were looking for an eagle eating a snake on top of a cactus, and they found it in an island in the middle of lake Texcoco. They built their city, there, in the middle of the lake. When the Spaniards marching with the conqueror, Hernan Cortez, saw the Aztec city of Tenochtitlán, one of his soldiers wrote that nowhere in Europe had he seen any city as magnificent as the Aztec city of Tenochtitlán. Nonetheless, as magnificent as Tenochtitlán was in the eyes of the Spaniards, the impact Teotihuacán had on the Aztecs was even more profound. After they had settled their capital in lake Texcoco, the Aztecs proceeded to establish and expand their empire. In their explorations of the region, they found the ruins left by the Toltecs in the middle of the dessert valley. The ruins were so magnificent that the Aztecs, not knowing who had built them, knew that they were not built for ordinary humans. This city had to be birthplace of gods. Thus, it was called Teotihuacán, or the city where gods are born.

Read more in the upcoming Teachings of a Toltec Survivor

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5 thoughts on “The rise and falls of Humpty Dumpty

  1. You have a wonderful way with words, Koyote — this is a tapestry that transcends millennia and fleeting imperial ambitions: those “humpty-dumpty” sorts. I love that mythology: an “eagle eating a snake on top of a cactus” Thanks so much 🙂

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