What Is the Etheric Double?

A reader, Rohit Agarwal, asks:

Going through golden flower book , is just simply amazing experience.

I have a question , when koyote ji , says that in etheric double , one can go anywhere on this planet. Does he says in different sense or literally it means one can roam around the entire planet just as going on world tour spending hundreds and thousands of dollars.

Asia , America , europe , all of world is it accessible same way as in organic body and all the experiences one can have at these places in organic body , one gets in etheric double. Or is there some differences in experiences of organic body travels and etheric travels. Is something of organic world experience missed in etheric travels or everything of organic is included plus more.

Please explain. It will help greatly.

Thanks

———————

Viento de Octubre responds:

Asia, America, Atlanta, the bottom of the ocean, my brother’s prison cell, falling with the rain, bouncing with dessert sand in a gust of wind, the edge of the thermosphere…

Koyote’s intensives (Diaphanous Shell, Bhakti the Future, Meditation, Aka Dua, The Dreaming, etc.) all contain the experience of such feats and tasks as he writes and talks about. While the books contain the recipe and the instructions, his personal training include the practical, tangible experience.

There are differences, some as Mary F Scott points out, and then some! The etheric body may come to be known as having its own intelligence. The process taught by Koyote of building an etheric body out of the substances already being produced by the organic body, mixing them with the genius of magick and the ancient teachings, and then training and learning how to use it well enough to transfer a piece of your consciousness into it, turning it on, and have it produce other substances—the ones required to build an astral body—all has to do with a very organic-like process of growing and evolving—all very much within the limits of nature as defined by the shaman and the alchemical magician.

The communication between the etheric body with the conscious, cognitive mind takes learning the language, training, adjusting. It is much more like Rose says, personal. No one can tell you what heat is communicated as to you, if your mind translates it as “hot” or “danger”. The communication between etheric body and organic body is instant and immediate, on the other hand. The body will seek to nurture it and protect it, and objective communication is possible. For example, heat is communicated by the etheric body to the physical body immediately; and, a party of voyagers, such as is always the case in Koyote’s intensives, encountering heat in the Dreaming or etheric waters will all tend to communicate the encounter—some as heat, some as color, some as a dangerous presence, etc.

The physical body is not usually there in all its glorious presence when voyaging in the etheric plane; it plays its own role, though, definitely, and must be trained to handle the voyage. With excellence, as Koyote teaches, the physical body is tangibly present and aware throughout. The etheric body, regardless, communicates directly what is being encountered. This communication, with practice and experience, may be mastered and fine-tuned. Even before mastery, a group of etheric and astral voyages will come back to report, not only personal experiences of objective and collective data, but also changes to the very space their physical bodies have been in—things like increased heat, a mist in the room, a crispiness in the air, the presence of an angelic breeze, time distortions, sparkles in the atmosphere, etc.…

The bodies each report what they are capable of reporting, and they each report to the same internal agency, each in their own language. The magician, the voyager, the dream yogi manages to master the language of these bodies in order to communicate instructions that lead to the manifestation of Will. In many ways, the etheric experience is, then, as tangible as the physical experience to those who have the dreaming body fully developed.

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A View from a Gnostic Scholar … pt 3

Analysis of The Teachings of a Toltec Survivor by Paul Joseph Rovelli:

“Moving onto the next three chapters of this book, Chapter 7, titled: Pinche Aguila and Pinche Koyote, is full of short stories; some funny and some pedagogical. But the keynote story is about Koyote’s meeting with his benefactor and how he was given the name, Koyote. The story is presented in two parts; one being a vision in a cave from the fever of tuberculosis, and later the fulfillment of that vision. The chapter overall, seems a development of the Preface; where in this review, we submitted that the author presented his credentials.

Chapter 8: You Have Not Been Properly Cooked Yet, presents the notion that there are three types of attention. But it is difficult to glean what exactly these are, as they are not clearly presented. The difficulty comes with the idea of three brains; coupled with the idea of the attentions. Yet, the brains themselves are not clearly delineated, with the same really going for the attentions. The first attention is initially associated with the robot or the automatic consciousness of the body/mind complex. And the second attention is immediately connected with the frontal brain, while we are told that most people are only capable of having two attentions. The Koyote next tells us that we have two animal brains that are mechanical; the mammalian and the older reptile brain, with all these brains being “under law”—having instinctual tendencies. But we are left to infer a third attention with the assertion that “[a] third brain was added at some crucial point in our evolution.” This third brain gives us the ability to create imaginary worlds, archetypes, relationship, memes and signifiers, as well as “simulations of reality in our head.” And it is here that the third brain seems to be connected to the frontal cortex that also drives the second attention.

The frontal cortex may or may not be what the Koyote goes on to call the forebrain with the “tail brain” possibly being both the mammalian and reptile brains. And the problem for most is that the function of the front and tail brains is reversed from what could be said to be by suggestion, their intended purpose. Later, the forebrain is said to be used by the first attention, as it develops the ego and maps the world; the Tonal. The second attention then is said to be the “master of the carriage,” as aptly described at the beginning of the book; driving the human machine, and associated with the instinctive center with several archetypes related to it. It is these archetypes that “the magician and sorcerer learn to use consciously,” which is a very accurate portrayal of my own claim that magick is all about a controlled psychosis.

For me personally, the Koyote, despite his confusion of brains and attentions, really hits home with the following:

“What we ordinarily call emotions are reactive and involuntary. All these reactions are triggered by external events, or by memories and thoughts. We respond with these emotions, and the force of the emotional response direct the actions of the body. These emotions are fueled by repulsion and attraction—the twin horses pulling the carriage. The true emotional centrum, however is proactive and voluntary, conscious.”

The work of the Philosophus of the A.’.A.’. is to gain control of the attractions and repulsions, which can then be clearly measured by one’s ability to produce “proactive and voluntary,” indeed, “conscious” emotions. Repeatedly through the book, so far, I have seen the Koyote state the ideas of Castaneda an Crowley in a more articulate manner than either of these writers have ever done. So I’m more than willing to forgive the Koyote the confusion he generates in this chapter for the gems he simultaneously gives to us. Indeed, the blind and reactive emotions he describes as being “a reverberation from an external impression upon the observer”—which suggests the work of the Neophyte of the A.’.A.’. being sworn to examine all experience as having an affect upon his or her pantacle. Indeed, any “impression hits the moving centrum and creates a reverberation”—an unconscious, automatic response.

And I have to say, as it’s been nagging at me since I wrote my review of the previous three chapters, and as it now pertains to the next chapter that I am about to discuss, the Koyote once again gives us a teaching of Castaneda in a more articulate manner than Castaneda could have hoped. And I quote:

“What are the consequences of liberation? You are free from the support of the Great Magician as well, so when you free yourself, you find yourself in the jungle, and there are other dangers out there. Therefore, you have to become a warrior, and you have to become a hunter of power, and you have to know that death can come at any moment.”

Chapter 9: Never Eat Steak in the Afterlife! Deals with generalities. An idea that I very much like and have often spoken about, deals with the danger of leaving the safety of the fold of the Great Magician; an analogy for the safety of the church in Christian culture. And for the Koyote, the safety of living in the Tonal; that one might become “ambushed” in one’s wandering in the jungles outside. This requires a directing of the intent in a way that I have often spoken about myself, but is more clearly presented by the Koyote than I have been able to do, thus far. And I will take from this; moving on into the future. Indeed, by reading poetry or listening to music; viewing art, et al, one is actually recreating that art and thereby creating other worlds outside the Tonal in which to sojourn.

With this, the work of the spiritual teacher is discussed; making the teacher to be the one that provides the discomfort necessary for breaking out of the Tonal. Here we get some recursive reiterations of assertions made at the beginning of the book, but now, we are armed with a better tool for understanding. And with that, the Koyote shows us just how the book works at creating change in the reader; confirming a bold assertion made at the beginning of the book. As we come to see this, we learn the value of reading and especially of writing (Thoth/Mercury, the god of writing) in Magick.”

If I had to write

If I had to write that which describes you, I’d have to be able to illuminate the silence, to open the cranial plains that separate the infinite mystery from the grey thicket, and thus invent a world in which each movement of the plume would draw infinite words where each one reflects the totality of every other.

Or, perhaps, I’d simply have to touch the paper with my plume; knowing that your homonyms do not relate nor describe, but rather draw on the firmament the hidden caresses to your invisible face, without knowing perhaps, or maybe without caring, that no one could ever decipher such sketches.

Si tuviera que escribir

Si tuviera que escribir lo que te describe, tendría que poder iluminar el silencio, abrir el llano craneal que separa el infinito misterio de la maraña gris, y así inventar un mundo en el que cada movimiento de la pluma dibujara infinitas palabras que reflejaran cada una la totalidad de cada otra.

O quizás simplemente tendría que tocar el papel con mi pluma, sabiendo que tus homónimas ni relatan ni describen, sino más bien dibujan en el firmamento las caricias ocultas a tu rostro invisible sin saber quizá, o sin importarle tal vez, que nunca nadie podrá jamás descifrar tales bosquejos.

Apapachar: To Hug with Your Soul

There are words untranslatable, and when translated something of essence is left out. The word “apapachar” used by Mayan influenced people, like in southern Mexico and Central America is one such word. Many dictionaries translate it as “spoil” or “pamper”.

How curious that in English the word emphasizes either the ruining of something in a child (because when overdone, the child becomes “spoiled rotten”), or the indulgence given a person when you do things for them they could do themselves (as it happens when you pamper someone in a spa).

What then, is “apapachar”? It is associated with pamper or spoil because of the image of a parent hugging his child or a lover cuddling and whispering tender nothings.

There is no word in the English language that I’m aware of, and if we were to translate literally from the Mayan, to apapachar is “to hug with your soul.”

Know that You’re Surrounded by Mystery

The Dreaming is a Beast, and it speaks to you. It moves for you. Watch it carefully with all your attention in the moment. Don’t assume that you already know what’s happening.

When you already know what’s happening, you have already gone to sleep.

Know that you are surrounded by mystery. Know that death is hunting you. Know that behind you is a dark abyss of the unknown and that this may be your last moment.

Put all you have into this. That’s how you engage with the dreaming: as if this is your last moment; not as something that you will get later; not as something trivial.

There are no trivial moments for the warrior.

Transcend the Limits of Perception

The ultimate end of the Toltec warrior’s training is to master one’s own perception. In a sense, this is also the aim of yoga, magick, and alchemy. In all these esoteric traditions, the aspirant seeks to fine-tune their awareness to perceive and hold the consciousness of the cosmos, the supreme being.

These practitioners seek to change the way they perceive the universe. They seek to be able to see the universe from the perspective of God, and in this manner attain the knowledge of the gods. It is an act of ultimate aspiration for those who follow the path of knowledge and self-transformation.

The way to do this is to learn to transcend the limits of human perception, and identify with the perception of the infinite. To stand in the place of the supreme being and witness the beauty of creation is to become one with all, even if for a moment. The life that follows this supreme vision will be vastly different from the life of an ordinary human being, a life far beyond the limits imposed by the false beliefs and petty agreements we have allowed to cloud our vision.

–from Dreaming’s Gate: A Doorway to the Higher Dimensions

A Doorway to the Higher Dimensions

This, then, is the key to learning to consciously go from the waking to the Dreaming, and indeed to any other plane of existence where we have formed a body:

You must learn to withdraw your attention from one plane and place it on another at will.

If your attention is placed on the external world, on the stimulation coming from your physical senses, then you will withdraw your attention from the inner world of the dreaming. But, if you know that the Dreaming is always there, it is a matter of just moving your attention from the world your senses perceive and placing it on the inner world.

This movement might seem hard to do at first, but it is actually very, very simple and easy. It is so easy that we do it every day and every night. The difficulty is not in withdrawing the senses from one plane and placing it on another, since we do that every day. The difficulty is learning to do it at will. It is a movement, a switch we have been doing automatically, like breathing and the beating of our heart; but just like breathing, we can also decide to do it voluntarily.

You can choose where your attention will be placed.

You can use the Dreaming’s Gate to train yourself to gain mastery of your attention, to access your dream world at will; and later, even, to use this ability to access higher planes of consciousness.

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A View from a Gnostic Scholar… pt 2

Paul Joseph Rovelli continues his review of The Teachings of a Toltec Survivor:

Here’s the next three chapters, read for my review:

The next three chapters present the Great Magician as the demiurge in ancient Gnostic literature. And while there is commonality between the two, there is also differentiation. Chapter 4 is titled: The Personality and the Essence of Sheep. As any Las Vegas magician will tell you, the success of any trick lies in the magician’s ability to divert your attention away from where the real action is happening. But for the Great Magician, he is telling you that you already have a soul; deceiving you from the Gnostic truth that you must create your soul from one’s essence in its admixture with the physical vehicle. Creating the soul is the key to releasing oneself from the imprisonment of the essence that is said to be trapped in matter. And therefore, like Blavatsky asserts, our immortality is conditional; based upon our ability to complete this task.

Chapter 5 is titled: Enlightenment for Sale! Anyone? This chapter dispels the myths of the New Age and other Theosophical misnomers (existing despite Blavatsky’s input). Karma and Maya are accurately described; probably for the first time in writing, anywhere in contemporary literature. Also, some ideas are presented on AMRIT and what the Koyote calls the “coating”—an idea yet, that needs more explaining. But it seems this coating produces the subtle bodies, and I certainly enjoy the parallels with some of the defining documents of the Gnostic Church of L.V.X. There are also a few ironic parables the clearly drive home an important message.

And in Chapter 6, titled: The Great Magician, he clearly shows this demiurge, functioning as the lord of the Black School of Magick. While I personally find some disagreement with the Koyote’s rendering of the order of the letters of the Tetragrammaton, I agree with his overall point that cultural emphasis has been placed on patriarchal ideals and away from the matriarchy. And I would disagree with the idea that we are essence trapped in matter, as mentioned above, and that indeed, we are essence liberated in matter; that we can produce this soul that the Great Magician fears we can have the power to produce. And the Koyote does come around to pronounce this by stating, “Fortunately, there can also be liberation in a different way [from death]: in self transformation.”

Other brilliant ideas are presented in this chapter; quite consistent with Thelemic doctrine. This liberation in truly only available for the few; warning us that if it should ever become a large movement, the Great Magician would surely cut it down. This is why Liber AL tells us that it is for the few, who will ‘rule over the many and the known.’ Such rule must then be seen as belonging to those who develop their souls to perfection; a rule of awareness. But also, through the institution of war, which closes the chapter, as one learns of Ra-Hoor-Khuit: “I am a god of war and vengeance.” For though the Great Magician uses war to control the masses, the instrument of war also “creates self-identity,” as the Koyote clearly points out.”–Paul is the director of the Gnostic Church of L.V.X.

Click here to get a copy of The Teachings of a Toltec Survivor.