Paul Rovelli reviews The Golden Flower (pt. 3)

“The first chapter of Part One is ‘Fearless’ and reads like a surreal parable in the Koyote’s personal dream story. One senses a mythological journey evolving through his poetically imaginative experiences. The work on one’s inner attitude towards death is consistent with soem of the work of Liber HHH. The Koyote takes the work one step further in direct confrontation with death. With his push to be creative and use the imagination, he not only gets to the heart of magickal praxis, but quickly introduces the Vedantic perspective of the Silent Self that observes the dream.

The next chapter ‘On Lucidity of Apperception’ gives specific practical instructions for approaching lucid dreaming. And the Koyote shows how this is consisten with trances one can swork with in waking life, i.e. scrying and evocation techniques, being similar, as described in the next chapter: ‘The Four Regions of the Dreaming.’

In the next chapter: ‘Waking Dreaming,” the Koyte asserts that we are always dreaming (24/7); right at the outset, which resonates perfectly with Jungian teaching on the subject. The dream then is a primal consciousness. And the Koyte gives practical instrucions for skrying and visualization. The concept of the Dream Avatar is introduced in ‘Dreamings Gate’ and the ‘second attention’ is described, as being the unconscious with then, the first attention being waking consciousness.

And in the final chapter of part One: ‘The Key of Dreams’ describes perfectly, a practical approach to balancing the psyche. This is essentially, the Great Work done with the Avatar or Holy Guardian Angel. It is as concisely lucid a statement, as any I’ve seen on the subject.

Part Two is titled: And the Flower Unfolds; Petals of Light. The first chapter, Across the Borders of Dreaming both relates a personal experience; being initiated into dreaming as a child and a technical lesson, “You can always find what you see.”

The second chapter, The Yoga of Dreaming presents the alchemical notion that describes the two states of consciousness (waking & dreaming) that can be congealed to work together to serve that higher purpose, which is called the ‘essential self.’

In the third chapter, The Organic Bluprint of a Soul, the difference between waking and dreaming is presented as being simply two environments that the brain has constructed for itself, as a result of evaluating and delimiting the enormous amount of internal and external sensory input into the mind. This is very much in line with Jungian notions on the formation of identity.

The Etheric Body, the fourth chapter opens by describing what essentially is the Kantian a-priori. “This, your actual experience right now as you are reading this page, is the brain perceiving the brain.” We as human beings are described as being individual packets of energy that each contain a Universe that we call this world. The Etheric Body is referred to as the “Tonal”–a Toltec term; known to most through the writings of Carlos Castaneda. It is described as being a body of energy that exists between pure consciousness and the physical body; as apt a description as I’ve ever read. And a simple and natural exercise is presented to help the dreamer focus on the Etheric Body as being behind the physical body.

The fifth chapter, How to Construct an Astral Body shows how to apprehend the Universe in that quantum packet of energy that is the complex of the physical body and the human mind by using one’s imagination and visualization of the aggregate material that the mind has held onto in its active memory.

Again, a simple and natural exercise is given to create this body that can travel into this imaginary visualization of one’s self-created Universe.

And finally, in the sixth chapter of this section, it is proposed that the imagination is the only limit. The dreaming Shaman can assume non-human forms and travel to un-human worlds. In praxis, one’s daily experience is consistently developmental and experimental. The Kyote gives tips on how to broaden the scope of the imagination to find all these possibilities.” — Paul Joseph Rovelli, director of the Gnostic Church of LVX

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Paul Joseph Rovelli reviews The Golden Flower (Part 2)

“The last chapter of the book: “Kabbalistic Analsysis of the Dreaming” is a brilliant manual in itself, on the praxis of sexual magick. Koyote the Blind explains in qabalistic terms, how consciousness in its use of intent, generated from an attitude of prayer carries a seed that meets with a droplet of amrit from the Divine.

This follows from a description of this bestowal of grace (Gnosis) from the Divine, as a necessary pre-requisite for the proper attitude by which to approach the magick.

Clearly implied in Koyote’s interpretation of the New Testament parable of the rich man and the eye of the needle, is Crowley’s dictum: All magick not for the Knowledge & Conversation of the H.G.A. is Black Magick.

But ultimately, Koyote the Blind sums up the whole of his thought in the yogic practices of Yama & Niyama and how the dreeaming works with this. It’s concisely stated when he says: It is through the flow of images and information from the subconscious that the artist, scientist, and innovator of any field draws the material that results in the works of genius that have the thumbprint of destiny.” –Paul Rovelli, director of the Gnostic Church of LVX

Check out the Golden Flower here.

Paul Joseph Rovelli reviews The Golden Flower

The director of the Gnostic Church of LVX is writing a wonderful review of my book, The Golden Flower. Here is part one:

“I just got and have already started reading Ricardo Flores’ (Koyote Ciego) new book release: The Golden Flower. So far, I’ve read all the preliminary writing (About the Author, Acknowledgements, Preface and Introduction). The Acknowledgements alone should wet your appetite for the book. The wonderful people he’s studied and trained with and the heart-warming remembrance he brings to them shows a man with great depth. And I know enough about him personally, to know what a fabulously interesting life he’s led and the fine character he’s forged.

Reading as jazz, improvisational musician, I’ve already found in the Introduction, much that correlates with what I’ve experienced in heightened states of inspiration. So that I can tell that dreaming has a much broader meaning than what the approaching reader might assume and indeed, it encompasses the whole of your being and your whole life.

From there, I’ve skipped to the last chapter on the Qabalistic analysis of the Golden Flower. But last night, my reading time expired about the second page into this. Yet, already, Flores is right on the money in regards to the nature of the Will and in a way that it seems almost no Thelemite understands anymore.

On page xxiv the aphorism in bold print states: “You are the totality of all. You are the hidden source of all experience, the experiencer, and the environment we call the dreaming.” First mystically, it’s two compact sentences; one, that we are the totality of the ALL. We each are the one God in its totality, as we are also and simultaneously, the holographic individuation of all ITs parts. This is then compactly but fully expanded in the following sentence; we each, truly are a trinity of beings; the experiencer and the source of that experience, as well as the environment in which the experience takes place. And we reflect the ineffable being in its totality.

It becomes plain to see that all experience and everything connected to experience is in one big holographic whole. This is what the Koyote Ciego calls the dreaming. And his aphorisms are build on this fundamental principle.

Overall the intensity of the Koyote Ciego puts into his aphorisms is combined with a beautiful expression of words that could approach as much as what a jazz improvisor would come to see, as a means for devloping an improvisation. Think of that improvisation, as an experience created by the experiencer and revealing elements of mind and soul that is the divine muse.

So the dream is really the dream of life and the Introduction has really wet my appetite for more. This weekend, I’m skipping to the last chapter on the Qabalah of Dreaming…can’t wait!”

(More to come from Paul Joseph Rovelli)

Ego is a useful tool

To really destroy the ego would be as useful as destroying the body, intelligence, creativity, language, etc. The ego is a construct we create to navigate and experience this world. Why get rid of it—eve if such a thing could be functionally possible? No, the ego is a magnificent tool. We must learn to use it well. The key, unlike many falsely teach, is not to destroy it, and not even to weaken it.

The key is to make it an efficient, well crafted, strong, and equilibrated tool. To do this, you must not let the ego be the boss of you. It is a part of you and your tool. The ego that ignores the master is unbalanced, afraid, and out of control. Train it well, keep it healthy and strong, and it will be a worthy avatar to your earthly experience.

Phyllis Seckler (aka Soror Meral) QED 2004

Today is the anniversary of the death of Phyllis Seckler (aka Soror Meral), one of the luminaries of Thelema. A true pioneer.

One of her students, and one who continues to carry the bright torch of Thelema, Marlene Cornelius, shared the following article by Phyllis Seckler. It is as relevant today as it was last century, and it feels like she is observing what is happening in the world today and shinning a light for our hearts.

Also, here is a picture of a sample of Phyllis Seckler’s esoteric art. This was a gift from my dear friends: Marlene, Vicky, and Elton. It is proudly and gratefully in display in the heart of our home.

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PROJECTION AND THE SHADOW (by Phyllis Seckler)

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Everyone has contents in the unconscious mind which are usually not allowed to surface. There is a build up of ideas of who one is and how one behaves and what one believes that has been going on for years. The environment and parents and other influences have been strict about not allowing negative or primitive passions to surface. Thus everyone develops a censor which prevents the shadow self of the unconscious from appearing in daily life.

However, certain events may trigger an outburst of the shadow self in all its ugliness and ferocity. Then the usual reaction is to blame someone else or several others for one’s own unconscious self. It would be otherwise too painful to admit that one could be so demonic, cruel and hateful, plus many another reaction which has previously been forbidden. This blaming of others is called projection.

Some of the events which could cause an appearance of the shadow are related to strong emotional reactions to any event in the life. Anger and fear can be explosive, as well as other strong emotions. Also stress of various sorts can bring on an appearance of the unconscious shadow self. A long term hatred bred by centuries of non-acceptance of other life styles or religions has been evident in human history for centuries.

Some individuals have a type of character that they are able to infect others so that they take on the same attitudes, of intolerance, falsification of facts, outright lies, emotional disturbances, hatreds and persecution. Those who also harbor an uneasy and bothersome shadow in their characters are only too happy to follow the leader and to take on a cause which suits their inclinations. They also blame someone else or a whole group of persons for the troubles which they cause for themselves.

As a few examples: we have the persecution of witches in Europe and America. In more recent times we have a great many dictators able to sway the emotions of the masses. There was Hitler in Germany, and Stalin in Russia, and many another right up to the present day. In America we have had the Ku Klux Klan, and Senator McCarthy hunting down Communists and helping to give rise to a fear of Communism. A great many innocent persons have suffered from the cruelties and the persecutions. All this is very reminiscent of a pack of dogs hunting down an innocuous small creature.

There are also some single individuals who seek relief from an eruption of a bothersome shadow by finding a victim which they can then blame for anything and can harass and persecute for as long as they can get away with this behaviour before being caught. But when the perpetrator of these cruelties is caught he takes on a self righteous attitude. He pretends to be a hero or a martyr or he may run away or he might show cowardice of various kinds, he sticks to his lies and other opinions. But rarely or never does he ever admit to the projection of his own shadow self upon someone else. He still goes on blaming his victim for every shadow trait in his own character.

The universe is evenly balanced. We live in a world of cause and effect. What a person gives out to his world is exactly reflected in the behavior of the world around him. Each person needs to ask himself when something important happens to him: “What did I do to cause all this phenomena?” Actually, everyone is responsible for what happens around him and in which he is involved. It is of no use to blame someone else for events and happenings. That is the way of the coward.

In Thelema we say “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.” This means that one should be paying attention to one’s own business without poking one’s nose into the business of others. It also means that one should leave other persons strictly alone to find their own way towards the True Will. Of course the relaxation of this rule could happen only if one is asked to help out in certain circumstances.

Sadly, we see that many persons can mouth the above sentence and instruction from the Book of the Law, and then begin to interfere with others in various ways such as telling others what to do, by indulging in gossip which almost never comes close to the truth, by playing various games of power grabs, and by the projection of the shadow self onto anyone that is disliked. There are hundreds of different ways in which various persons interfere with others. Are these Thelemites?

Then we end our greeting with “Love is the law, love under will.” But is it love to indulge in actions that harm someone else? There are many instructions about love in the Book of the Law. One which affects all who have joined some sort of Thelemic community is this from Chapter II, verse 24. “Love one another with burning hearts; on the low men trample in the fierce lust of your pride, in the day of your wrath.”

One can show wrath to those who have interfered with others as this is one low way to behave. Also certain mean actions such as cruelty, vindictiveness, persecutions of any sort. In short, there is quite a list of behaviours which are Reprehensible and far from the behavior of a King. We are asked to become aristocratic: that is, to adhere to the highest code of conduct which we can devise for ourselves. Everyone is guided by our Holy Book and then one also devises an honorable code for him or herself. Each person is different, and this is why honor and love of each person will be expressed in a different way from anyone else.

Let us try harder then to live up to what we have accepted as the Law of our lives!

Love is the law, love under will.”

Dr. Gerald Porter reviews The Golden Flower

Review of The Golden Flower by Koyote the Blind

By Gerald Porter, PhD

“The Golden Flower by Koyote the Blind is a very special book. It is timeless, and yet, perfect for these troubled times – attuned with a unique sensitivity to the requirements of our time.

The Golden Flower is also a very practical book. Practical if you want answers to the big questions and are prepared to use your own experience as the laboratory of discovery. Koyote with great candor reveals his personal journey and models for those with eyes to see and ears to hear how to engage the mysterious with honesty and integrity. This is the embodiment of practicality and relevance.

Koyote presents an understanding of the dream that is big and encompassing. It is a pitch perfect response to the postmodern inquiry that has plagued scholars who have lost their way since cutting the moorings from the illusory comfort of the consensus reality. He provides a viable strategy to any in the alienated majority brave enough to find answers aligned to their personal experience.

Koyote, who is anything but blind, with this small volume provides anyone seriously seeking the tools to discover their own unique way. Although he always acknowledges each seeker’s absolute freedom that is their birthright, he does so always affirming the fundamental demands of the Great Work, of which he is a true teacher. If Koyote can be considered blind, then he is like the prophet Teresias, who was undeceived by the glamor of the world, so that he could have unfettered vision of the deeper truths.

If you are fortunate enough to acquire this beautifully laid out volume, you will not only have access to the rare information it contains, but will have in your possession a magical talisman. Such an object can only be unlocked by a pure heart and an enquiring mind, at least a little freed from the shackles of our reductionist materialist culture – a talisman with the power to fuel passage into new worlds not for amusement but self-discovery.

The Golden Flower is one of my most treasured possessions. One of a very small collection of books that speak my secret language, that until I started reading these words had eluded me. Turning each page was an act of discovery followed then by the most profound remembrance. Each word was spun not only by a master who knew the secrets of dreams from firsthand experience, but a poet who graced each word with the transformative magic that gave grist for the discursive mind, but more importantly, stirred the soul and called me home.

If the word “dream” conjures up rich and inexplicable mysteries as irresistible as a siren’s seductive song, then you should not deny yourself this very special volume. It is a bright beacon shining through the darkness.”

The Golden Flower will be available in paper back on June, 2018. You can pre-order here:

http://a.co/15WRKcS

You can still get the collectible hard cover edition by clicking here:

http://a.co/8wk97J0

Preserve the Medicine Wheel

The community at Xicoco has built this Medicine Wheel, a sacred circle open to all people for prayer and healing. We are now about to lose the land where it is built. The landlord is selling the property, and in a matter of a month, they will come in and tear this beautiful and sacred wheel apart to sell it. We have the opportunity to purchase this land, but we need your help securing the funds to open escrow.

We need your help to be able to preserve the Medicine Wheel, to continue offering it for the benefit of all beings everywhere, to continue with our sacred sweat lodge, our classes, our art, and our teachings.

The Medicine Wheel is a living artifact that is helping many find their inner guide, heal, transform their lives, and bring insight and peace to our world.

With your support, we will be able to set up a non-profit organization to preserve the medicine wheel, to continue with our sacred practices, and to promote the Teachings of Koyote the Blind.

These funds will allow us to obtain a loan to buy the land where the Medicine Wheel is.  Please help us preserve the land and continue offering the teachings, the sacred arts, and our lives for the benefit of all beings everywhere.

Click here to Preserve the Medicine Wheel

Viento de Octubre’s reviews The Golden Flower

“When we first started working on editing The Golden Flower, we had no idea it would morph into the artifact it turned out to be. This book is a tool of practical application resulting in direct engagement with the self. But this book is also a doorway into another dimension. And this book also carries an amount of presence, its own sentient emanation. This phenomenon has to do with the practice and reality presented in his book.

In a very practical level, The Golden Flower is a user-friendly guide to the other dimensions, with an emphasis on ascension, evolution, and mastery of self. It is full of practical exercises and experiments, all of which allow one to begin a personal exploration of the Dreaming immediately. Theory is bathed in masterful prose. The words alone, without doing the exercises, lead one to heightened states of awareness—but just slightly so, enough that it can become tangible—and in this state, one is able to clearly perceive the presence of the Other Self, the Dream Self. The exercises will then lead us to a better understanding of ourselves by exploring the Dreaming and the worlds beyond with the aid of these other parts of ourselves.

This book was first forged in the Dreaming. Every chapter Koyote sent to us for editing turned out to be blue prints. Every word uttered aloud while writing it, while revising it, became a cell of purpose, an imprint, a condition, a direction, an instance of life, and its very breath. The Golden Flower isn’t just a bunch of pages bound together to contain an idea. It is also a vertical construct, like a tower, a ladder, or an unfolding spiral—as it appears in the Dreaming. The book itself, under the correct conditions, both external and internal, will open a doorway into a construction of Koyote’s own devise existing in the astral, running through the etheric and, now, down to the physical. The Golden Flower is Koyote’s doorway into this place, and it is the manifestation of it in its entirety in the physical world. It is here that the training begins, and one enters it almost immediately and without notice.

Gently and securely, one is guided into the first instances of awakening into the Dreaming and towards the recognition of the Other Self. Before long, one becomes aware of just how to proceed into one’s own path of discovery and ascension.

The Golden Flower is an artifact. Its emanation is evident in people’s stories about how powerful it feels to hold the book in their hands; about how it seems to be magically charged; about how it feels as if it has a presence of its own, a consciousness. It has all of these things, which is why many copies have instinctively and inspiredly ended up with a spot on many an altar in many homes. It has a purpose and it carries a charge, both in the electrical sense and in that it has a responsibility and a task. If you allow it (and it is easy to do so—you’ll know what I mean once you start reading it), The Golden Flower will open up for you, and you will immerse yourself in the Yoga of Dreaming, which is the unfolding of your own Self.”

View The Golden Flower on Amazon

First and Last in the Medicine Wheel

The first and last of the Major Arcana unify in the accomplishment of the Magnus Opus. The Fool and the World, the Aleph and the Tau, come together in the Medicine Wheel, just as the Aleph and the waters of Binah came together in the beginning.

Tau is the cross, the finite that intersects the levels. Aleph is the origin of all. The silence of the Aleph and the silence of Saturn are here united, just like the centripetal and centrifugal forces, though opposites, become one in the balance of the firmament.

The search for truth keeps it away.

The truth is not outside. Everything outside your Self can only serve as a reflection of your inner nature.

The search for truth outside the Self will lead nowhere. It won’t be found in any dogma, religion, system, belief, or practice. All these can do is show adumbrations of the inner truth.

Like the sun reflects itself on the water, so can the inner self reflect its light on the surface of the mind. The clear, silent mind reflects the light of our solar nature, our true Self.

The real value of the mind is as a tool to examine and realize the futility of its own efforts. When the mind realizes its own futility, it drops the effort and simply reflects the inner light in the silence of its non-doing.

Check out this episode of my Toltec Survivor podcast!